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4 Reasons to Become a Nurse in Florida Now

4 Reasons to Become a Nurse in Florida Now

The COVID-19 pandemic has healthcare workers at the forefront, emphasizing the need for registered nurses in Florida and the rest of the country. Along with physicians and surgeons, nurses are an integral part of the medical teams that are at the front lines in the fight against the novel coronavirus. Nurses are risking their lives to save patients and treat those with COVID-19. In the process, they are making a true difference in the world.

Unsurprisingly, there has been a rise in nursing opportunities during the COVID-19 pandemic. The need for registered nurses working in hospitals and other healthcare facilities has never been greater. So, if you are thinking about a career in healthcare, consider that now is the right time to become a nurse in Florida. Here are four reasons why you should start your journey to become a registered nurse now.

 

1.      Nurses Truly Make a Difference

The nurses working in hospitals, emergency rooms, and intensive care units are today’s heroes. They are fighting to save lives and provide patients exceptional care in the face of this overwhelming pandemic. If you are someone that wants to make a real difference in the world and is up for a challenge, becoming a nurse while this global health crisis persists will be a good choice for you. The chance you will significantly impact the lives of others is better now than ever.

 

2.      Nursing Shortages Have Gotten More Serious

There has been a nursing shortage in the United States prior to the coronavirus pandemic and it will only get worse. According to projections by the American Association of College of Nursing, there will be a need for 203,700 new registered nurses each year through 2026.1 These were calculated before the COVID-19 pandemic, so numbers are likely to be higher now.

In a recent report by the New York Times, a growing number of nurses were reported to have been quitting on-the-spot due to the high pressure, lack of PPE, and overall dire conditions in areas suffering high rates of infection.2 This shortage means more nursing opportunities during COVID-19, opportunities you can take advantage of if you become a nurse in Florida soon.

 

3.      Increased Pay Opportunities

Due to shortages and continued high demand, those graduating from an accelerated nursing program and entering the job market now are more likely to be offered high-paying positions. Opportunities for high wages are starting to pop up in facilities and hospital departments with a high need for registered nurses. Candidates are being offered sign-on bonuses, crisis pay, quarantine pay, and other stipends.

 

4.      Government Aid for Healthcare Programs

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the federal and local government has recognized the significant need for healthcare workers and nurses. There are numerous COVID-19 bills and incentive programs that are in the process of being finalized. Once they are launched, you can expect government-aided programs to train new healthcare workers and allied health professionals including registered nurses. Students enrolling in RN courses soon may find it easier to access financial aid or grants to help cover their education costs.

FVI School of Nursing has two campuses in South Florida: FVI Miami and FVI Miramar. In addition to offering several healthcare courses, our nursing school in Miramar offers excellent RN nursing programContact us or call 786-574-3350 for more details.

Sources

  1. American Associate of College of Nursing – Nursing Shortage
  2. Pauline W. Chen, M.D., The New York Times – The Calculus of Coronavirus Care

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